Amazonia 2.0

Amazonia 2.0 is a project funded by the European Union, coordinated by IUCN-South and executed by a consortium of trained organizations in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru and Suriname, in a set of territories that cover more than 1.5 million of hectares in total.

The project was born in 2017, as a strategic alternative to fight the threats and pressures that are exerted on Amazonian forests, through the proper management of indigenous and campesino territories.

It’s an initiative that focuses on populations that “live in the forest and of the forest”, in a “bottom-up” work, that strengthens local capacities to create their own management models to prevent, address and mitigate damage, safeguarding natural heritage.

The Amazonia 2.0 intervention model has as its fundamental tool local oversight or monitoring, that allows indigenous or campesino communities to become a technical figure that ensures the sustainable management of their resources. The work of the local monitors, overseers or rangers, generates resonance in their communities, producing an impact on decision making in local, departmental or provincial and national authorities.

It’s precisely this incidence that allows a reduction of threats and pressures through the monitoring and attention of cases; and also, territorial management with a local and intercultural perspective, to achieve the purpose of conservation, restoration and sustainable use of natural resources.

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General Objective

Contain the deforestation and degradation of Amazonian forests, the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services, including climate related issues, empowering a set of indigenous and campesino organizations to act and respond in an organized manner together with national and international NGOs, to face the threats against their forests, in each one of countries of the project.
  • Specific objective 1
Establish an Amazon platform for information exchange and rapid response, learning, interactive and built within the framework of an articulation of six indigenous territories and campesinos, allowing the recording, analysis and reporting of information in real time that contributes to the monitoring of deforestation (pressures, threats and illegal trafficking of wild resources), and monitoring of the governance processes and validity of REDD + safeguards.
  • Specific objective 2
Strengthen the technical and organizational capacities of indigenous and campesino communities and organizations with emphasis on social control, comprehensive territorial management, independent monitoring of forest governance and illegal trade in wild resources, in addition to the impact on national and regional policies on climate change and forests.

EXPERIENCES


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    Fanny Jael Jamioy - Colombia

    There are 12 environmental monitors, who look after the social and environmental well-being of their territory. Three of them are indigenous people, belonging to the Inga Indigenous Reservation of Niñeras, and nine are campesinos (rural country people), inhabitants of the Mononguete nucleus in Solano (Caquetá), in the Amazon region of Colombia.

    Fanny Jael Jamioy, a leader who deserves credit for her work as an environmental monitor, firmly believes that Amazonia 2.0, since its inception in 2017, "has been the possibility to dialogue, build and generate agreements that allow us to survive over time and give a harmonious management to the territory, taking into account the needs and world views of both the 21 families of the reservation that live in the lower part of the Niñeras stream, and the 157 campesino families, grouped in 8 communities, in the middle and upper part.

    The possibility of living in peace

    According to Fanny, the value of the territory is the possibility of living peacefully; of having the chagra (sowing) and the forest as sources of life; of living with others and with nature. Since the declaration of the Niñeras reservation in 1988, 93% of the forest in this area has been conserved, resisting not only the presence of armed groups, but also the pressure to transform the landscape that the surrounding villages have suffered as a result of cattle ranching or the cultivation of coca leaf.

    The community agreements that have been created are related to the care of the water in the Niñeras stream. For both communities this is their most precious asset. "We did nothing to preserve the water if they continued to deforest and contaminate," says the monitor, referring to the positive changes in the relationship between her community and the campesinos. In addition to carrying out community monitoring of the territory, they have made a joint effort to clean up and restore the springs of the stream, to open up to the exchange of knowledge and to forge ties of cooperation.

    For Fanny, an Inga woman from the Indigenous Reservation of Niñeras, her motivation is to teach her children and her community the value of caring for nature.

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    Francildo Matias - Brazil

    Francildo is a young leader of the Manchineri people. He lives in the Mamoadate Indigenous Territory, in the town of Peri, located in the state of Acre, Brazil. In addition to training as an Indigenous Agroforestry Agent, the proactivity of Francildo and his ease of communication and use of new technologies, made his community choose him as a monitor for the Amazonia 2.0 project.

    In October 2019, it was the first time that Francildo left Acre and the country to participate in the III Congress of Protected Areas of Latin America and the Caribbean (CAPLAC), as part of the first training sessions around the project, in Lima, Peru. There he exchanged experiences with other Peruvian, Colombian and fellow monitors such as the Waorani, he met with the Ambassador of the European Union and spoke in one of the panels about the reality of his territory and his people. In addition, he made friends, like the indigenous rap singer Eler Gabriel Rojas from Peru, he fell in love with the sea, seen for the very first time and, curiously, wanted to know what beasts were there.

    “Francildo is a young leader of the Manchineri people. He lives in the Mamoadate Indigenous Territory, in the town of Peri, located in the state of Acre, Brazil."

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    Monitoring House - Colombia

    The Communal House of the ProDesarrollo Association located in the Miravalle village (Solano, Caquetá, Colombia), was adapted as a Community Monitoring Center in 2018 by environmental promoters articulated in Amazon 2.0.

    Without a doubt, this site has been key in strengthening territorial governance, with positive results in the search for alternatives that: prevent returning to the most violent times of a municipality that has been affected by the armed conflict; contribute to the well-being of communities, and contribute to the protection of biodiversity.

    Until three years ago the village of Miravalle was desolate. However, since the involvement of environmental promoters and their work, the environment has a different air. The families that had abandoned their homes, returned and the Monitoring House became the epicenter of meeting between people and the leaders of the different paths of the Mononguete nucleus. In the House take place training sessions, gatherings, meetings and decisions are made on socio-environmental issues.

    This change in the dynamics has strengthened community relations and has allowed farmers from the Mononguete nucleus, and indigenous people of the Inga Reservation of Niñeras to collectively design actions for the sustainability of natural resources and in general, for the construction of a territory with better possibilities for all.

    “Until three years ago the village of Miravalle was desolate. However, since the involvement of environmental promoters and their work, the environment has a different air.”

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    Eslin Torres - Peru

    Eslin is one of the Forest Monitors of the Amazonia 2.0 team in Peru. In his words he explains how his participation has been in the project:

    “Being a monitor is one of the challenges I have as a person. I have contributed to the indigenous communities as articulator and nexus of this spine and, despite the little presence of the State, I have tried to establish a link with the forestry authorities.

    The oversight has allowed strengthening the training and implementing the monitoring of the territories and forests, thus achieving the insertion of the “veedurías” (monitoring) as technical instances for decision-making related to forest activity and wildlife.

    Previously, the disorganization due to lack of knowledge in forestry law meant non-compliance with the rules, generating fines. Now that has changed, and thanks to that, also the reality of indigenous peoples, improving the management of forest resources, making profits and learning from mistakes.

    I had no difficulty in exercising my duties as a monitor because they were fused with my daily activity. I would take the position again and again. And if I had to give advice to a person who wants to be a monitor, I would tell them to pay attention, be empowered, trained, ask what they don’t understand and give everything of themselves.

    Once the project is finished, I will continue to support with my work as I have been doing until today.”

    “Now that has changed, and thanks to that, also the reality of indigenous peoples, improving the management of forest resources, making profits and learning from mistakes.”

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    Rogelio Casique Coronado - Peru

    Meet Rogelio, Indigenous Forest Monitor of CORPIAA (Regional Coordinator of the Indigenous Peoples of Atalaya), AIDESEP base, Peru. Here is his experience as a monitor:

    “I completed my technical studies in the specialty of agriculture in Atalaya 10 years ago, but far from dedicating myself to agriculture I dedicated myself to forestry. When I was offered the opportunity to be a Forest Monitor, I had no complete idea of what it was, I sensed that it was like being a forest watcher for the communities, and when I started in the position, I began to discover that it was something else, that it was not only being a vigilant but a manager, such as a doctor for the patient of the forests in the communities, who is dedicated to providing technical assistance for the management of the territory and the forest, which wasn’t only to take advantage of the wood, but to represent the communities in meetings, workshops, manage information in an orderly manner, train people in communities, advise leaders, as their technical right arm.

    Thanks to the constant teaching and support of the A2.0 project professionals, I have been able to improve my skills, order my knowledge, apply my skills. I think that being a monitor is a profession that you form in practice, being a monitor is being in the field of events, in the day-to-day life of the communities, where the institutions don’t always arrive, you listen to the demands of the people, you see the people's needs, you enjoy the forest, but you also worry about its destruction.

    I believe that it’s necessary to continue betting on the “veedurías” (monitoring), to train more young people, to train them in the field with equipment, in computer management, writing, to look for ways to find mechanisms that compensate for their dedication, so that the communities can feel more their contribution, if the Monitors are consolidated I believe that governance in communities and organizations will improve even more, therefore we will ensure that forests are always there, but if we don’t support or strengthen the monitors, the risks of community poverty, corruption and destruction of forests will increase. ”

    “Thanks to the constant teaching and support of the A2.0 project professionals, I have been able to improve my skills, order my knowledge, apply my skills.”

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ACHIEVEMENTS

Since 2017, when the project started, there are many advances and goals that we have been able to achieve; intertwining the efforts of each of the members of the consortium.
  • 57

    indigenous or campesino monitors.
  • 2955

    people trained in 149 courses or workshops.

  • 1828

    monitoring reports.

  • 15

    agreements with indigenous and campesino organizations.

  • 02

    agreements with public entities.

  • Planning and management tools, protocols, guides, etc.
  • Adaptation of monitoring indicators at local and community level.
  • Adjustments in community and indigenous organizations statutes, complementing with regulations for the use and exploitation of natural resources.
  • Exchanges of monitoring experiences in Atalaya Peru, and in the province of Caquetá in Colombia.
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Contact Us

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